Rustic heirloom tomato and goat cheese tart {on a rosemary crust}

words by Gina Weathersby
photography and styling by Gina Weathersby/kiwi street studios

My tomato plants are happily growing and full of baby heirloom tomatoes…but none quite ready for us to pick yet. Simple fix, a leisurely trip to the farmer’s market over the weekend took care of that.
I may have overdone it a bit, but no worries, I can always think of something to do with sweet, summer tomatoes.

I came across this recipe last week on a wonderful food blog called bella eats (and is now happily pinned to my pinterest foodies board.) I think I wrote…must try this.
Today was the day.

No surprise, I tweaked the recipe a bit. I added basil as a topping and instead of spreading the goat cheese over the entire bottom, I sliced and arranged it alongside the tomatoes. Either way, goodness awaits.

 

rustic heirloom tomato and goat cheese tart {on a rosemary infused crust}
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Author: from A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen, by Jack Bishop
Ingredients
  • Crust Ingredients
  • 1-1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp minced fresh rosemary
  • 8 tbsp (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • 4-5 tbsp ice water
  • Tart Filling
  • 6 oz fresh goat cheese, crumbled (about 1-1/3 cups)
  • 3 medium, delicious tomatoes, cored, sliced crosswise 1/4-inch thick, and blotted dry between paper towels*
  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt + freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. First, make the crust dough (about 1 hour before you’re ready to assemble the tart). Place the flour, salt, and rosemary in a food processor and pulse several times to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles pea-sized crumbs, about ten 1-second pulses. Add the water, 1 tbsp at a time, and pulse briefly after each addition. After 4 tbsp of water have been added, process the dough for several seconds to see if it will come together. If not, add the remaining 1 tbsp water. Process just until the dough comes together in a rough ball. Do not overprocess or the dough will not be flakey. Transfer the dough to a lightly-floured work surface and knead briefly to for a smooth ball. Flatten the dough into a 5-inch disk and wrap it in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour and up to 2 days. Note: My dough was very sticky with just 4 tbsp of water, so I wound up adding some flour to help it to come together. The final dough should be smooth and supple before refrigerating. Also, if you don’t have a food processor, you can still make the dough by using forks or a pastry blender to cut the butter into the flour mixture, then add your water.
  2. Move an oven rack to the middle position and heat oven to 375°.
  3. Unwrap the chilled dough and roll it into a 12-inch circle on a lightly floured surface. Lay the dough over a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom, fitting the dough into the bottom and sides of the pan. Run the rolling pin over the top of the tart pan to trim the excess dough. Prick the bottom of the tart shell all over with a fork.
  4. Finally, fill and bake the tart. Scatter the goat cheese evenly across the bottom of the tart shell. Arrange the tomatoes over the cheese in two rings, one around the outside edge of the tart pan and another in the center, overlapping them slightly. Drizzle the tomatoes with the olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Bake until the edges of the crust pull away from the sides of the pan and are golden brown, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool the tart on a wire rack for at least 10 minutes. Cut the tart into wedges and serve. Also, it is really good at room temperature so feel free to make this ahead and let it cool for several hours.
Notes

* To dry tomatoes, lay 3 layers of paper towels on a flat surface. Place your tomato slices on the paper towels, and then cover with 3 more layers of towels. Gently press your hands over the tomatoes to extract as much liquid as you can without crushing the tomatoes. When you lift the slices from the towels, many of the seeds should stay behind. This will keep your tart crust from becoming soggy.

 

 

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The Healthy Apple - July 23, 2012 - 11:14 pm

I LOVE your recipes and amazing photography!!! What a beautiful post. I cannot wait to try to make this for my family; they are going to love it.
Thanks for posting; have a great night!

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